Leather Hobonichi Covers (Arts & Science vs. Midori)

After considerable thought, I decided to get a new Hobonichi cover this year. I’ve been eyeing leather covers for some time, especially the ones produced by Arts & Science (Arts & Science is the boutique run by Sonya Park, who creates the English-language Planner); but up until last year the leather covers came with zippers and lots of sleeves – too fussy and bulky for my taste. This year the design was perfect.

Coincidentally, lots of other people fell in love with this year’s A&S covers, too. The navy and grey ones sold out in a matter of hours on September 1st, and I almost missed out on the orange Aragosta, which was gone the next day. They restocked them in October, but again the covers sold out in a couple of days. (It looks like the grey Argilla was the runaway hit.) They are now offering to restock all three colors next February.

When I unboxed the Aragosta, I found the almost fluorescent orange hue quite alarming – it was very different from the deep, mature orange in the photos. Also, the leather showed weird press marks, especially at the edges. Maybe this is the result of scoring or otherwise preparing the leather for cutting.

Fortunately, the marks seem to be fading, but it will take time. I got used to the color too. Overall, the cover is thick and encloses the Planner comfortably, allowing the front and back covers of the Planner to slide in and out of the sleeves smoothly when opening and closing. This is important, as the cardstock covers of the Planner are not very strong and will crease easily.

The reason I finally gave up on my Midori cover was the minute difference in size. In theory, Midori goatskin covers should fit the Hobonichi Planner, since they both conform to the A6 (bunkobon) format. However, the Hobo is slightly thicker than the Midori; and the Midori cover is intended to fit the slimmer Midori MD notebook perfectly. Which means that if you try to use the Midori cover for a Hobo, the fit will be really, really tight, and will make the spine of the Planner curve.

One unexpected thing about the Aragosta was that the bookmark seemed to be quite bulky. This is probably because the bookmark is cut from the same leather as the cover, which is nice, but probably a mismatch for the extra-thin Tomoe River Paper that the Planner uses.

Leather should age, but at this point I have no idea how this orange cover will change over time. The Midori goatskin cover tanned considerably over the past several years – the contrast between the original pale beige and the current caramel hue is quite striking.

Finally, this is my Weeks for next year: “Coffee Beans” (also sold out at this moment). I got a clear cover for it this year because I found out (the hard way) that when they suffer water damage, the covers tend to curl. I’m looking forward to using this next year – maybe I’ll be tempted to fix myself a latte every time I reach for it :D

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My First Field Note (And Thoughts on Notebook Sizes)

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Last week I finally got to join the legions of Field Notes users, thanks to a kind friend. After all this time! I first encountered the bewildering FN phenomenon upon joining the blogosphere, and while I did see a few specimens in my local stationery store in Montreal, I never got around to buying them for myself. Now that I have one in my hands, I find myself struck above all not by its design or paper quality, but by its dimensions. I’ve never seen a notebook in this particular size before. And I’ve been thinking about why this should throw me as much as it does, when notebooks are free to come in all shapes and sizes.

For starters, a Field Note is really small. And thin. And tallish, considering its other dimensions. It says 48 pages, but that means 24 sheets, or, rather, twelve sheets folded and stapled in the middle. I’ve never seen a notebook that cries out this loudly to be put in a checkered flannel shirt pocket; I find the shape very masculine. Women’s clothing don’t usually have the kind of pockets to store these in, and if carried around in purses or bags, they would crease right away. This notebook confounds my Asian sensibilities – too thin and undetachable to be a memopad, too small and vertically long to be a notebook. Uncategorizable.

I’ve set the Field Note next to some other small notebooks/memopads I have: the Kokuyo Campus Notebook No. 5 (48 pages), a Life Noble Memo Pad (B7, 100 sheets), and another Life notebook (N15b, 40 sheets). In this size, products I’m familiar with usually come with more sheets that tend to be more square and glued together. It’s a distinct advantage of FN’s that the stapled pages lie flat, allowing the user to make the most of the small page. But it has too few pages compared to other premium-quality notebooks of its size; also, while Japanese brands tend to concentrate more on the quality of paper inside, Field Notes is all about design. And the design is undeniably well done; it’s another example of the best kind of Western design, that pulls together a seemingly simple combination of color, texture, and typeface, and achieves something very clean and classic.

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If I were resident in the U.S., I think I would have tried a subscription if only for the pleasure of being dazzled every season by its covers, but once abroad the cost becomes prohibitive. (BTW I wonder how thick the pages are, in terms of grams per square meter?) And I already have some notebooks too pretty to use, similarly American-made: Rifle Paper notebooks. I am sure my Field Notes would suffer the same fate if I ever signed up for them…

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Thinking about sizes helped me clarify a problem I had for a long time with my Hobonichi Weeks but couldn’t put my finger on up till now. The Weeks is thin, light, portable, and employs this wonderful Tomoe River paper, and I haven’t had any problems using it. However, for some reason, I like it less than my original Hobonichi Techo (planner), and am thinking all the time about what weekly I can replace it with next year. Why? I realized that its dimensions reminded me (however subliminally) of the basic “business diary” so ubiquitous back home and in Japan. There are two popular formats for “business” diaries: one is in a weekly format, thin, vertically long and has gilded pages, and the other is a larger and much thicker page-per-day diary. Both kinds are produced with vinyl or synthetic leather covers in drab brown or black, and are often issued to employees by corporations at the end of the year. When I was writing up this post I asked my husband whether he had a company-issue diary, and of course he did (seen below next to my Weeks). The actual sizes vary but the general dimensions remain strikingly similar (both kinds of diaries can be seen in this size chart at Takahashi Shoten, a Japanese publisher).

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Oh, that dreadfully kitschy gilding! I will never be able to enjoy Smythson’s or any other gilded notebook on its own merits :(

I guess the Hobonichi people tried to take the business edge off the Weeks by making it slightly larger and roomier (mindful of the large number of female Techo users maybe?). It’s officially called “wallet size” (and it does match the size of my wallet), but it smacks of crumpled suits and Samsonite document bags all the same. The Nikkei starts its review of the Weeks with the sentence, “The business diary that Hobonichi, with its philosophy of mixing work and leisure, came up with is in a left-sided weekly format…” So for me, long and thin equals “official” and “business”, whereas more square formats signal “laid-back”, “relaxed”, and “private”.

I think the size factor also underlies the almost universal affection for the original Hobonichi Planner. It’s a standard A6, 105mm-by-148mm format, but more importantly, this is exactly the size of Japanese pocket books (bunkobon). Non-Japanese users of the Techo don’t seem to grasp the full significance of this size even when told of it, because in the States, “pocket-sized” paperbacks actually come in several different sizes (all larger than the standard Japanese one) and use coarser paper which make for a thicker volume. All in all, American paperbacks don’t look or feel much like notebooks. However, Japanese paperbacks are tailored to a much more uniform size across publishers, use smoother, thinner paper (and are therefore more compact), and more popular in their home country. The bunkobon is an immediately recognizable and beloved format. In Japanese bookstores, the bunkobon shelves are allotted by publisher, and the row upon row of precisely matched, color-coded small books can be a sight to behold.

Here is a sample row of bunkobon (in the middle), with regular hardcovers on the left.

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The bunkobon is 1/4 of an A4-sized sheet; top left is a collection of essays by Haruki Murakami, top right is the Hobonichi Planner, bottom left is a Life Premium notebook, and bottom right is a Midori Cotton MD notebook.

Given this background, I am naturally interested in other A6-sized notebooks, such as these Kokuyo “Buncobon” notebooks that JetPens is offering (but I’m not ordering them, as shipping alone costs $47!). Muji seems to make some out of recycled paper too. It was interesting to read the comments, though, for the former. People seem to dislike the soft covers, but in my opinion the soft cover is precisely what gives the notebooks their bunkobon flavor; more durable covers should be found in other, mostly Western brands, such as the Quo Vadis Habana notebooks. The memories of a soft, pliable, and light book are what give these Japanese notebooks their particular appeal.

A New Planner

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A new planner is exciting for so many reasons. A whole year, as yet unsullied, no mistakes, regrets or embarrassments – at least not yet. Who knows what the future will bring? We are up for a transfer next year, but we do not yet know where we will be going next. Holland was a strong candidate until recently, but due to unforeseen circumstances, we are back to square one. I wonder just where I’ll be writing in this journal next, if not from a canalside café ;)

I did end up getting a leather cover for my Hobonichi, one of the simplest I could find. It’s from Midori and designed to fit their own slightly slimmer MD notebooks, so the fit is a bit tight. I had to press it down with a big book for a couple of weeks (my son’s French dictionary helped). Midori says you have to tan it in sunlight for 2-3 weeks before using it in order to let the leather develop a sort of patina that will protect it against water and dirt (the leather is sold completely untreated “so that the user can enjoy the mellowing of the leather himself/herself to the utmost”), so I was doing that with precious little to show for it, but then I learned that the tanning was a much, much longer, gradual process, so I’m just using it as is. The leather is a warm peachy beige and wonderfully soft to the touch. I wish it could stay like this forever!

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